Media Discernment Instructional Unit

 

Glen E. Dawursk, Jr.

Updated 6/16/08

 

 

 

 

 Introduction and Rationale for Teaching the Unit

 

Throughout a lifetime, we are influenced by many factors which contribute toward our values, beliefs and moral judgments – and eventually contribute toward our behavior.  People are influenced by multiple things in life including relationships, family, parents, friends, experiences, sexuality, maturity, intellect, education, religious beliefs and convictions.  Out brain is like a sponge.  Each of these becomes another item “soaking” in our sponge.  No one item fills the sponge; instead they all become pooled together within the sponge.  The causes of teenage violent or immoral behavior can not simply be attributed to a linear deduction. It is important that we understand that the media on its own does not cause a person to become any of these things.  They are all items “soaked up” which become combined with our other influences in our life. 

 

Many factors in the portrayal of media violence contribute to its affect on children and teens. (Comstock, 1994, Huesmann, 2001).  “Many studies indicate that a single factor or a single defining situation does not cause child and adolescent antisocial behavior. Rather, multiple factors contribute to and shape antisocial behavior over the course of development.” (CDCP, 2000) Teenagers are influenced predominately by the media during a critical time in their mental development.  This is further complicated by the fact that most youth are home alone often and they lack parental influence.  Their mentoring is done via the media through video games, movies, the internet and music.  According to the book How Well Do You Know Your Children, 63% have both parents working and three fourths are “latchkey kids” where a parent is not home when they arrive from school. According to their research, teenagers average 3-1/2 hours alone each day (Kantrowitz & Wingert, p. 39-39).

 

The problem occurs when we consider that during the teenage years, the media becomes a youth’s “predominant” influence.  It causes repetitive messages to be “soaked-up” into a person’s brain – messages which when pooled together can significantly affect a person’s overall “sponge.”  Eventually, the media’s reoccurring message could stimulate the emotional section of the brain and could negatively change a person’s behavior causing youth to compromise or totally ignore their social and spiritual upbringing.  While the media is not the sole determiner of the sponge, it can significantly compromise it.  But what if we could adjust our media consumption to be more in line with our morals, beliefs and values?  What if that portion of a person’s sponge was clearer and not muddied with the corrupt messages of the media?  Obviously, the impact of adolescence would not be easier, but the conflicting messages during adolescence would be less of an issue.  The media’s messages for violent retribution, sexual behavior and material worldliness would no longer be the preferred model, but instead family based values could once again take precedence. 

 

The  following short term curriculum is intended to teach middle school or high school youth the impact of the media can have on them, proper media value judgments, brain science as it relates to media’s influence on youth and families, and the importance of media discernment.  It is consistent with Wisconsin state standards for social studies, English and technology (grades 8 and 12). The following key facts will be presented and are backed by a thorough literature study (see www.mediandyouth.com):

 

  • The media is one influence in the behavioral development of a youth.
  • The graphic violence, overt sexuality, morally mixed and negative messages of the media have polluted the established truths a youth may have learned at school, home and/or church.
  • In the teen years, the media replaces and or takes on a more significant influence upon youth than at any other time in their lives.
  • Stronger research is necessary to make the correlation between media and its influence on youth; however, there seems to be enough research to justify a concern and a preventative approach to the issues of media influence.
  • The media messages and portrayals do have a lasting negative effect upon a youth’s behavior and judgment.
  • Proper media discernment and evaluation processes must be engrained into the youth’s minds to allow them to better cope with the graphic violence, overt sexuality, morally mixed and negative messages.
  • Significant reductions in the negative influences of the media are necessary.

 

The grade level or content for which the unit is written: 7-12 grades

 

Integration of two or more content areas:
The material is intended as an integrated English (media), social studies and technology curriculum; however, psychology or sociology could be substituted on the high school level. 

Scope / Sequence of Unit including Activities Planned and State Standards:

 

Day

Theme

Power Point

Activities

# 6 of Study Questions

Assignment

State Standards

 

1

Values

None

· Valyuse Island Cast Vote

5

·  Personal Values Inventory

·  Choose Unit Exam or Unit Project

SSE.8.8

SSE.12.7

 

2

Media’s Values & Messages

Part Three: Media’s Values and their Messages

· Media Search:

· Message Evaluation

5

·  Examples of Media Values

EngE.12.2; EngE.12.4

TechA.12.2

TechA.12.3

 

3

The Brain &
Research

Part Two:
Brain Science

 

· Getting Roped: Peer Pressure Activity

· Optional: Bible Study on Peer Pressure

7

·   “Reaction Paper”

EngF.8.1

EngF.12.1

SSE.8.8

SSE.12.7

 

 

4

Discernment

Part One:
Youth Violence (Media’s Effect)

Part Four: Discernment

· Cling Together

· Circle Sit

5

·  Media Essay

·  Unit Exam or Unit Project

TechA.12.2

TechA.12.3

SSE.8.8

SSE.12.7

 

5

Assessment / Project Presentation

None

Unit Test OR Project Presentation

None

None

NA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The unit requires an original 141 slide power point called M3&Me developed by me which is the “text book” for this course. The slide show is based upon a literature review I wrote for a previous course and this integrated curriculum builds upon those presentations. If a computer and projector are not available, the slides can be printed out and used as a handout instead.  The slide workshop is divided as follows:

  • Slides 1-20: Introduction to youth violence – Why?
  • Slides 21-28: Sponge theory and definition of M3 and Me
  • Slides 29-35: Brain research as related to Media’s influence on youth
  • Slides 36-115: Examples of current media influence
  • Slides 116-124: Do the gatekeepers really mean it? 
  • Slides 125-141: Discernment principals and resource links.

 

  Lesson Plans

 

 

 

Day One:

 

Theme:

Values: What is important to me?

 

Behavioral Objectives:

At the completion of the lesson, the student will be able to:

·        Define, explain and give examples of values and value judgments

·        Explain that people have shared and conflicting values

·        Explain how and why values can change

 

Wisconsin State Standards:

Social Studies E.8.8 and Social Studies E.12.7

 

Materials:

LCD projector or Power Point handouts; Valyuse Island Handouts; Personal Values Inventory Handouts

 

Power Point Workshop Section:

None

 

Activities:

 

Valyuse Island Cast Vote

Divide the group into smaller groups of 4-6 people.  Give each small group a list of the people on the island.  Have them decide who will be the only TWO left on the island.  Bring the groups together after 20 minutes and discuss individually each person asking why or why they did not include them on the island.  Look for their “value judgments” as they proceed through the process.  Finally, have the groups get back together one more time and have them discuss why they chose the final survivor.  Please note their value judgments during the process.  If you have time, have them try to choose one survivor for the whole group. 

 

Discussion Questions:

·  What are values?  Where do they come from? 

·  How did your values enter into your decisions during the Survivor Vote activity? 

·  Can our values change?  Why or why not?

·  How do we feel when others “force” their values on us?

 

Assignment / Assessment:

Complete the Personal Values Inventory Form

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day Two:

 

Theme:

The Media’s Values and their Messages: What does the media have to say to me?

 

Behavioral Objectives:

At the completion of the lesson, the student will be able to:

·        Identify the impact of image and context on particular audiences receiving the same message

·        Formulate questions addressing issues or problems that can be answered through a well defined and focused investigation

·        Explain why decisions regarding the use of technology are dependent on the situation, application, or perception of the group using it

 

Wisconsin State Standards:

English E.12.2; English E.12.4; Technology A.12.2 and Technology A.12.3

 

Materials:

LCD projector or Power Point handouts; old newspapers, magazines, and movie handbills 

 

Power Point Workshop Section:

Part Three: The Messages in the Media

 

Activities:

 

Media Search
This activity will require some advanced preparation.  Find printed newspaper or magazine advertising, comic strips, newspaper headlines and banners, and movie handbills AND make a list of television advertising slogans or jingles or memorable phrases from popular television shows or movies and type them out.  When you have all the material, cut the ads, comic strips headlines, banners, handbills and phrases in half.  The idea of the game is to put one half of the media item on the back of every person participating in the activity.  As it is taped to their back, they should NOT see what it is.  Instead, when it is time to begin, they are to roam the area seeking out someone to tell them what their item says or describing what it appears to be.  Their job is then to find the person with the other half.  The activity ends when everyone has finished finding their partner.

 

Message Evaluation

As partners, complete the following questions about your media search phrase, ad or item:

1.      What type of media is yours from?  (e.g. Newspaper, magazine, television)

2.      What was the “message” or idea being presented?  Is there one?

3.      Could it be presented via another form of media? Why or why not?

4.      To whom was the message intended?  Who was the target audience? 

5.      Had you heard of the message or idea before today? 

6.      How do you feel about the phrase, ad or item?

 

Discussion Questions:

·        Does the Media give values?  How?  Why?

·        Do we hear or see them?  How?  Why or why not?

·        Why would the media offer “values”?

·        Did your phrase, ad or item promote or present any values?

·        What happens when a media’s value conflict with your own? What do you do?  What should you do?  Why or why not?

 

Assignment / Assessment:

Find five examples of “values” presented or promoted by the media

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day Three:

 

Theme:

The Brain as a Sponge; Research: What is going into my Sponge?

 

Behavioral Objectives:

At the completion of the lesson, the student will be able to:

·        Explain how the areas of the brain accept information from the media

·        Give examples to show how peer pressure may influence the behavior and decision-making of individuals and groups

·        Use scientific methods to assess the influence of peer pressure on people's behavior and decisions

 

Wisconsin State Standards:

English F.8.1; English F.12.1; Social Studies E.8.8 and Social Studies E.12.7

 

Materials:

LCD projector or Power Point handouts; two different length ropes; 6 chairs; blindfolds

 

Power Point Workshop Section:

Part Two: Brain Science

 

Activity:

 

Getting Roped: Peer Pressure Activity: 

** If this is being used by a religious school or church youth group,
a Bible Study is available at the end of this curriculum for use with this activity. 
This could add an additional day to the unit.


Ask for six volunteers from your group.  Have them sit in a semi-circle in front of the rest of the group.  Make sure the first person (A) can see the last person (F).  Tell the six that you will be passing an object around and all you want the people to do is feel the object. By passing, they are to find out all they can about the object.  There are two other very important rules to follow: 

1.      There can be NO SOUND as the item is being passed, and

2.      Each person must have their eyes closed.  Blind folds can also be used.

 

C     D

B                       E

A                             F

 

As soon as the small group closes their eyes, begin to pass a 12-inch piece of rope to the first person (A).  As soon as the first person is done feeling the rope, he will pass it to the second (B); the second to the third (C); and so on.  As soon as the fourth person (D) is finished with the rope, quietly take it from the person and pass a 6-inch rope to the fifth person (E).  Be sure to be as quiet as possible.  Don’t let anyone of the six know you’re switching the ropes!  As soon as the last person (F) is finished with the rope, put both ropes in your pocket. 

 

DO NOT AT ANYTIME ALLOW ANYONE OF THE SIX TO SEE THE ROPES!

 

Now tell the six they may open their eyes.  As an icebreaker, ask the members of the group, ONE AT A TIME starting with A, “What color was the rope?”

Now ask, “How long was the rope?

 

REMEMBER: DO NOT TELL THE SIX THAT THERE IS MORE THAN ONE ROPE UNTIL AFTER THE QUESTIONING IS COMPLETE.

 

Starting one at a time with person A, the guess will be between 10 and 14 inches.  Only E and F will be less than this.  After going around once, tell the group, “In order for this Bible Study to be a success, the group will have to come up with a fairly close, if not exact idea of the rope size.  Pressure the group members, especially E and F.  The second time through, the numbers should change.  E and F will especially change (in most cases) to a higher number.  Note any changes for later reference.

 

After the second (or third time if a significant change did not take place), tell the six that you used two ropes.  Ask the six (especially E and F):

 

“Did any of you feel pressured?”

“Did you want to change the size of the rope from your first guess? 
Why or why not?”

 

Explain how “peer pressures” caused them to change or consider changing their initial answers.

 

Discussion Questions:

·              Can a person or something cause you to change your mind or your values?  Why?  How?  When?

·              Is it wrong to compromise my values?  Why or why not?

·              When are you more likely to change your mind or your values?

·              Can this happen without you knowing it?  Is this fair?

·              What is “Brain Washing?” 

·              Does the media ever try to “brain wash” you?  How?

·              What can you do to prevent this from happening?

 

Assignment / Assessment:

Write a one page “reaction paper” to the research presented.  Do you believe it? Why or why not?  How do you feel about “brain washing?”  Do you feel the media brain washes you?  Explain.

 

 

 

Day Four:

 

Theme:
Discernment: How do I take Control of What Goes into my Sponge?

 

Behavioral Objectives:
At the completion of the lesson, the student will be able to:

·        Give examples to show how the media may influence the behavior and decision-making of individuals and groups

·        Use scientific methods to assess the influence of media on people's behavior and decisions

·        Understand that humans are faced with moral and ethical issues because technology is enabling very significant modifications to the natural world

·        Analyze, synthesize, and integrate data, drafting a reasoned report that supports and appropriately illustrates inferences and conclusions drawn from research

·        Identify the impact of image and context on particular audiences receiving the same message

 

Wisconsin State Standards:

Technology A.12.2; Technology A.12.3; Social Studies E.8.8 and Social Studies E.12.7

 

Materials:

LCD projector or Power Point handouts

 

Power Point Workshop Section:
Part One: Youth Violence (Media’s Effect); Part Four: Discernment

 

Activities:

 

Cling Together

Have the boys lock arms in a circle.  Have one girl try to pull the boys apart.  They can not “hit” or “pull hair.”  After a few minutes, have another girl help.  See how long it takes before one of the boys lets go and the circle is broken. 
This activity demonstrates the importance of working together for a common cause.  There is strength in teamwork.  Making the decision to change a person’s media habits is easier when there are others to help along the way.  The “invading” girls can also represent the temptation to go back to the media we were used to or to justify our past and current choices. 

 

Circle Sit

Have all the members of group stand shoulder to should in a circle facing in.  Have them turn to their right while staying tightly in the circle.  On the count of three, have them sit down onto the knees behind them.  Once they have comfortably found their position sitting, instruct them to stand again BUT TO KEEP THEIR FEET IN THE EXACT SPOT WHERE THEY HAVE THEM NOW. 

 

While they are standing facing the person’s back in front of them, take two individuals out of the circle.  Instruct the group to again sit down BUT REMIND THEM THEY CAN NOT MOVE THEIR FEET TO COMPENSATE FOR THE MISSING PEOPLE.  Stretch to sit down again on the knees behind you.  It is possible and the group will accomplish it eventually. 

Next, have them stand again, keeping their feet in the same spot.  Remove two more people from the circle and without moving their feet stretch to sit down again.  Eventually the circle will fall down.


This activity also shows the importance of working together and also demonstrates how sometimes it will require tenacity and endurance to maintain their commitment to changing their media habits.  It also shows when someone leaves the group, it hurts the whole.  Having friends who make the same commitment to be media savvy will make the process much easier. 

 

Discussion Questions:

·        How can we differentiate the messages in media?

·        How can we “self-filter” the media?

·        How can we use each other to combat the influence or “brain-washing” of media’s messages? 

·        Am I willing to commit to change my media habits and become more discerning of what goes into my brain – even if it may seem difficult to change?

·        How will friends affect my decision – good and bad?

 

Assignment / Assessment:

Write a 2-3 page essay on what I can do to become more media “savvy” and take charge of what goes into my sponge (brain)?  Explain why this is or is not important to you.  Finally, give your personal conclusion to the topic: I intend or I do not intend to change my media consumption habits.  Explain your decision.

 

 

 

 

Day Five:

 

 

Theme:
Unit Assessment / Unit Project

 

Behavioral Objectives:
At the completion of the lesson, the student will be able to:

·        Explain media’s influence upon a person based upon information supplied during the unit

·        Define and explain discernment through a unit test or unit project

 

Materials:

Unit tests; Editorial Information Sheets

 

Power Point Workshop Section:
None

 

Activity:

The student must choose one of the following assessment formats:

 

Unit Exam - 25 True and False questions

Students must explain why the false answers are not correct in order to get full credit. (Next Page).

 

Unit Project

Student will write a 500 word minimum editorial on the topic: Media’s Influence on Youth and Discernment.  The editorial must use information supplied during the unit as evidence, have a well written introduction, strong supported body with at least three criteria and a motivating conclusion. The editorial will be graded on spelling, grammar, strength of the argument, supporting evidence and references to the unit. The editorial must clearly take a position and to receive full credit, the author must read the editorial to the class the next day.

 

 

 

Media Discernment Unit Test  

Name ________________________

True and False:

Instructions: Mark “+” for true AND “o” for false.  If you mark a statement false, change the statement to make it true.

______ 1.       The media is one influence in the behavioral development of a youth.

______ 2.       Violence across the nation has increased significantly during the past decade. 

______ 3.       “One in every eight murder victims in the US is younger than 18. Almost 40 children and adolescents are killed by violence each week.

______ 4.       Media consumption by youth and children is significant

______ 5.       ages 12-17 average 22 hours of TV per week and 55% listen to 5 or more hours of recordings per week (tapes, records, CD’s). 

______ 6.       There has been a significant increase in violence, offensive behavior and negative Christian values portrayed by the media

______ 7.       Studies show that youth who are already at risk are attracted to alternative music like heavy metal or rap music from artists like Marilyn Manson or Eminem

______ 8.       Research has shown a correlation between the angry, depressive, blatantly violent lyrics and the increase in youth suicide and youth violence by those who are experiencing depression, school or personal alienation, suicidal tendencies, drug addiction and/or alcoholic issues and family relationship problems.

______ 9.       The media has been shown to affect how youth see their physical bodies.

______ 10.  The media has been shown to influence the moral values and permissive attitudes about sex.

______ 11.  The brain is manipulated by the media.

______ 12.  While the cognitive is the largest area, it is the emotional section which seems to have the greatest influence on our behavior.

______ 13.  Many factors in the portrayal of media violence contribute to its affect on children and teens.

______ 14.  The media plays upon the emotional jolts and often uses several simultaneously in order to arouse a significant and lasting emotional response.

______ 15.  One thing usually does not make our behavior change.

______ 16.  Recent research suggests that the final stage of the frontal lobe development which determines discernment versus response/reflex mentality among teenagers does not begin its final stage of development until around 5th grade and does not complete its development until about 17 years old.

______ 17.  Not everyone agrees with the current research findings

______ 18.  Current research seems to show that the media does have a direct effect upon youth attitude and does change their behavior. 

______ 19.  The graphic violence, overt sexuality, morally mixed and negative messages of the media have polluted the established truths a youth may have learned at school, home and/or church.

______ 20.  In the teen years, the media replaces and or takes on a more significant influence upon youth than at any other time in their lives.

______ 21.  Stronger research is necessary to make the correlation between media and its influence on youth; however, there seems to be enough research to justify a concern and a preventative approach to the issues of media influence.

______ 22.  The media messages and portrayals do have a lasting negative effect upon a youth’s behavior and judgment.

______ 23.  Proper media discernment and evaluation processes must be engrained into the youth’s minds to allow them to better cope with the graphic violence, overt sexuality, morally mixed and negative messages.

______ 24.  Significant reductions in the negative influences of the media are necessary.  One way is through discernment.

______ 25.  Everything we do, see, hear, or experience arouses a link between these neurons.  Recurring stimulus causes these links to become even stronger.

 Created by Glen Dawursk, Jr. – www.mediaandyouth.com

 

Sources Consulted

Comstock, G., & Paik, H. (1994). “The Effects of Television Violence on Antisocial Behavior: A Meta-Analysis.” Communication Research, 21, 516-546.

CDCP: Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2000, September). Best Practices of Youth Violence Prevention: A Sourcebook for Community Action.

Huesmann, R. (2001, November 5). “The Psychology of Media Violence: Why It Has A Lasting Impact on Children”. Iowa State University: The Impact of Entertainment Media and Violence on Children and Families. Retrieved on January 14, 2003, from http://www.extension.iastate.edu/families/media/program.huesmann.html.

Kantrowitz, B., & Wingert, P. (1999, May 10). “How Well Do You Know Your Kid?” Newsweek, 38-39.

Wisconsin Department of Instruction (2008). Wisconsin State Educational Standards. Retrieved on June 12, 2008, from http://dpi.wi.gov/standards/.

Woodard,IV, E., & Gridina, N. (2000). “Media in the Home 2000, the Fifth Annual Survey of Parents and Children.” The Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania. Survey Series No. 7. Retrieved  March 10, 2003, from www.appcpenn.org/mediainhome/survey/survey7.pdf.

 

Appendix A: Evidence for the Rationale

 

Violence across the nation has increased significantly during the past decade. 

 

In a survey of 1038 students in 1999, 19% said they had been hit, slapped or kicked at school and 25% say they are afraid another student will hurt them; 80% said they had bullied their peers in the past 30 days (Peterson, 1999, p.1D).  Over 50% of American teenagers think a “murderous rampage” could happen at their school (NYT/CBS 1999, p. 14).  In 1996, 10 percent of all public schools reported at least one serious violent crime to a law enforcement agency (AACAP, 2000).

 

Media consumption by youth and children is significant. 

 

According to  the statistics furnished by the National Institute for Media and the Family, ages 12-17 average 22 hours of TV per week and 55% listen to 5 or more hours of recordings per week (tapes, records, CD’s).  Ages 15-19 buy one-fourth of all recordings and they buy 38% of all movie tickets (Walsh, 1999).  The average American child grows up in a home with two TVs, three tape players, three radios, two VCRs, two CD players, one video game player and one computer (Kaiser Family Foundation, 1999).  70-80% of the U.S. population reads magazines and newspapers monthly (Bruner, 2002).

 

There has been a significant increase in violence, offensive behavior and negative values portrayed by the media.

 

Upon grade school graduation, the average child will see more than 100,000 violent acts on television, including almost 8,000 murders.  Upon high school graduation, these same children will have witnessed 200,000 violent acts and 16,000 murders (Huston, et al, 1992).   A three year study on media violence showed that:

  • “61% of television programs contain some violence,
  • 43% of violent scenes contained humor -- where the violators
    were portrayed as acceptable or appealing,
  • 44% showed no “immediate punishment”
  • Almost 75% showed no harmful consequences at all” (Smith and Donnerstein, 1998).

 

The brain is manipulated by the media.

Lt. Col. D. Grossman in “On Killing: the Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society,” says the US Army has determined:

·        “That the more realistic the video game is helps blur the difference between fantasy and reality;

·        Shooting at a simple target did not encourage real battle killing;

·        Shooting at “realistic” targets desensitized soldiers and made killing a reflex” (Leo,1999)

 

Recent research suggests that the final stage of the frontal lobe development which determines discernment versus response/reflex mentality among teenagers does not begin its final stage of development until around 5th grade and does not complete its development until about 17 years old.  Research further suggests that brain cells, once thought to not regenerate, actually do develop in areas of repetition (Walsh, 2003).  This suggests that repetitive stimulus during this critical stage of development might have a significant influence upon a person’s rational discernment capability and could be the reason for the desensitization of violence among our youth.  It would explain why seemingly normal youth have no despair in killing people at a school.  It would explain why the Columbine boys look forward to actually “playing doom for real.”  As this is new research, there is currently no direct correlation between frontal lobe development and media’s influence.

 

 

Appendix B-1:  Worksheet

Valyuse Island Cast

 

Chuck

Characteristic

Extreme Left

Rating

Extreme Right

INTEGRITY

Dishonest / Cheater

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Trustworthy / Honest

WORK ETHIC

Lazy

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Work-a-holic

IDENTITY

Individual / Solo

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Team Player

PERSONALITY

Passive

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Aggressive

APTITUDE

Common Sense Intellectual

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Prefers Physical Labor

Description: Always forceful, aggressive and in your face.  Tells you what you should do and doesn’t try to listen to your opinion.  A powerful and controlling leader.  Best friend on the island: Maustin.

 

Donald

Characteristic

Extreme Left

Rating

Extreme Right

INTEGRITY

Dishonest / Cheater

2  1  0  1  2  3

Trustworthy / Honest

WORK ETHIC

Lazy

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Work-a-holic

IDENTITY

Individual / Solo

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Team Player

PERSONALITY

Passive

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Aggressive

APTITUDE

Common Sense Intellectual

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Prefers Physical Labor

Description: Only thinks about money and material things; does not care about others unless he can get something out of the “deal.”  Will do anything for financial or personal pleasure – even if it involves cheating or is illegal.  Best friend on the island: Belinda.

 

Belinda

Characteristic

Extreme Left

Rating

Extreme Right

INTEGRITY

Dishonest / Cheater

2  1  0  1  2  3

Trustworthy / Honest

WORK ETHIC

Lazy

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Work-a-holic

IDENTITY

Individual / Solo

2  1  0  1  2  3

Team Player

PERSONALITY

Passive

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Aggressive

APTITUDE

Common Sense Intellectual

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Prefers Physical Labor

Description: Likes to get what she wants. Provocative and stylish, she uses her good looks to get what she wants.  Dresses seductively and has no problem “sleeping-around” if she gets what she wants out of the deal.  Divorced twice, her children currently live with her second husband.  She has not seen them in over a year by her own choice.  Best friend on the island: Luanne.

 

Hector

Characteristic

Extreme Left

Rating

Extreme Right

INTEGRITY

Dishonest / Cheater

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Trustworthy / Honest

WORK ETHIC

Lazy

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Work-a-holic

IDENTITY

Individual / Solo

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Team Player

PERSONALITY

Passive

2  1  0  1  2  3

Aggressive

APTITUDE

Common Sense Intellectual

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Prefers Physical Labor

Description: A non-confrontational and peaceful man who prefers to listen and follow than to talk and lead.  Reads regularly his religious book and seems to pray often during his free time. He does not know what to say to Belinda and Chuck.  Most conversations with others include a personal testimony of his religious faith.  Best friend on the island: none.

 

Luanne

Characteristic

Extreme Left

Rating

Extreme Right

INTEGRITY

Dishonest / Cheater

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Trustworthy / Honest

WORK ETHIC

Lazy

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Work-a-holic

IDENTITY

Individual / Solo

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Team Player

PERSONALITY

Passive

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Aggressive

APTITUDE

Common Sense Intellectual

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Prefers Physical Labor

Description: On the outside: Bubbly, energetic and outgoing; she tries to be everyone’s friend. On the inside: Behind the scenes she is plotting and deceiving others in order to win.  Best friend on the island: Jake.

 

Dominic

Characteristic

Extreme Left

Rating

Extreme Right

INTEGRITY

Dishonest / Cheater

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Trustworthy / Honest

WORK ETHIC

Lazy

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Work-a-holic

IDENTITY

Individual / Solo

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Team Player

PERSONALITY

Passive

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Aggressive

APTITUDE

Common Sense Intellectual

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Prefers Physical Labor

Description: Extremely opinionated and especially negative toward minorities; seems angry a lot.  Competitive and would have no problem hurting someone in order to win. Best friend on the island: Donald.

 

Mauston

Characteristic

Extreme Left

Rating

Extreme Right

INTEGRITY

Dishonest / Cheater

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Trustworthy / Honest

WORK ETHIC

Lazy

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Work-a-holic

IDENTITY

Individual / Solo

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Team Player

PERSONALITY

Passive

2  1  0  1  2  3

Aggressive

APTITUDE

Common Sense Intellectual

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Prefers Physical Labor

Description: The oldest member on the island, he always says, “the way things used to be” or “from my experience we should.”  Tires easily and rest often, but seems very wise, thoughtful and caring.  He can not wait to have a cigarette when he gets off the island. Best friend on the island: Chuck.

 

Jake

Characteristic

Extreme Left

Rating

Extreme Right

INTEGRITY

Dishonest / Cheater

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Trustworthy / Honest

WORK ETHIC

Lazy

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Work-a-holic

IDENTITY

Individual / Solo

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Team Player

PERSONALITY

Passive

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Aggressive

APTITUDE

Common Sense Intellectual

3  2  1  0  1  2  3

Prefers Physical Labor

Description: Somewhat chauvinistic, he flirts with all of the woman on the island.  He has been unhappily married for 11 years.  He is currently an unemployed salesman. Best friend on the island: Luanne.

 

Note: Some of the people do not know that someone else considers them their “best friend.”  Best friends typically share personal information and try to work together often.

 

Created by Glen Dawursk, Jr. – www.mediaandyouth.com


 

 

 

Appendix B-2:  Worksheet

 

Personal Values Inventory Worksheet

 

Name:  _____________________________________   Date:    __ / __ / __

 

Complete the following information about yourself:

 

MOST IMPORTANT

Write five things you consider MOST important to your in life now
These are things you would give up other things for.  Be specific.

 

1) __________________________________________________________________

 

2) __________________________________________________________________

 

3)__________________________________________________________________

 

4)__________________________________________________________________

 

5)__________________________________________________________________

 

 

LIKE ALOT

Write three things you like, but are NOT the most important to you right now.  These are things you like, but would not give up other things for.  Be specific.

 

1)__________________________________________________________________

 

2)__________________________________________________________________

 

3)__________________________________________________________________

 

 

DON’T LIKE

Write five things you DO NOT LIKE right now and find offensive, rude or distasteful to you.  If you have a choice, these are things you would avoid at all costs.

 

1)__________________________________________________________________

 

2)__________________________________________________________________

 

3)__________________________________________________________________

 

4)__________________________________________________________________

 

5)__________________________________________________________________

 

 

ONE THING IN THE WORLD

If you could change ONE thing in the world, what would it be?  Why?  Be specific.

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

 

ONE THING AT SCHOOL

If you could change ONE thing at your school, what would it be?  Why?  Be specific.

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

 

ONE THING ABOUT YOU

If you could change ONE thing about you, what would it be?  Why?  Be specific.

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

THREE RULES

You are the dictator of the entire world.  If you were to create three rules in order for society to live together better, what would they be?  How would your enforce your rules?

 

Rule #1:_____________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

Enforcement:_________________________________________________________

 

 

Rule #2:_____________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

Enforcement:_________________________________________________________

 

 

Rule #3:_____________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

Enforcement:_________________________________________________________

 

 

PERSONAL MISSION STATEMENT

A mission statement is a sentence or set of phrases which tell the purpose of a company or organization and set the vision for their future. 
Based upon your answers above, what would you say is your “purpose in life?” 
What are your values?  What is your “mission statement?”

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

 Created by Glen Dawursk, Jr. – www.mediaandyouth.com

 

 

           

 

 


Appendix C: State of Wisconsin Educational Standards Applicable to Unit

 

Social Studies

E.8.8 Give examples to show how the media may influence the behavior and decision-making of individuals and groups

E.12.7 Use scientific methods to assess the influence of media on people's behavior and decisions

 

English / Language Arts

E.12.2 Make informed judgments about media and products.

E.12.4 Demonstrate a working knowledge of media production and distribution.

  • Analyze the effect of media production techniques, such as music, camera angles, fade-outs, and lighting, on different audiences
  • Evaluate the impact of various market factors on the effectiveness of media production and distribution
  • Identify the impact of image and context on particular audiences receiving the same message
  • Develop and apply criteria for evaluating advertising campaigns for a variety of products, past and present

F.8.1 Conduct research and inquiry on self-selected or assigned topics, issues, or problems and use an appropriate form to communicate their findings.

  • Formulate research questions and focus investigation on relevant and accessible sources of information
  • Use multiple sources to identify and locate information pertinent to research including encyclopedias, almanacs, dictionaries, library catalogs, indexes to periodicals, and various electronic search engines
  • Conduct interviews, field studies, and experiments and use specialized resources (such as almanacs, fact books, pamphlets, and technical manuals) when appropriate to an investigation
  • Compile, organize, and evaluate information, taking notes that record and summarize what has been learned and extending the investigation to other sources
  • Review and evaluate the usefulness of information gathered in an investigation
  • Produce an organized written and oral report that presents and reflects on findings, draws sound conclusions, adheres to the conventions for preparing a manuscript, and gives proper credit to sources

 

F.12.1 Conduct research and inquiry on self-selected or assigned topics, issues, or problems and use an appropriate form to communicate their findings.

  • Formulate questions addressing issues or problems that can be answered through a well defined and focused investigation
  • Use research tools found in school and college libraries, take notes, collect and classify sources, and develop strategies for finding and recording information
  • Conduct interviews, taking notes or recording and transcribing oral information, then summarizing the results
  • Develop research strategies appropriate to the investigation, considering methods such as questionnaires, experiments, and field studies
  • Organize research materials and data, maintaining a note-taking system that includes summary, paraphrase, and quoted material
  • Evaluate the usefulness and credibility of data and sources by applying tests of evidence, including bias, position, expertise, adequacy, validity, reliability, and date
  • Analyze, synthesize, and integrate data, drafting a reasoned report that supports and appropriately illustrates inferences and conclusions drawn from research
  • Present findings in oral and written reports, correctly citing sources

Technology

A.12.2 Understand that humans are faced with moral and ethical issues because technology is enabling very significant modifications to the natural world

A.12.3 Explain why decisions regarding the use of technology are dependent on the situation, application, or perception of the group using it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While this curriculum is designed for public schools,
the following Bible Study may be used as an additional resource
for religious schools or church youth groups.

 

 

Optional: Getting Roped by Temptation

A Bible Study on Peer Pressure

 

Glen Dawursk, Jr. – www.mediaandyouth.com

 

 

BIBLE STUDY -- STUDY GUIDE

 

II Timothy 3:1-5          Is this here now?

 

II Timothy 4:3, 4........ Is this in our world now?  Should we avoid them?

 

Colossians 2:20........ Because of Jesus suffering and dying, we are free from the evil of this world.
We are no-longer SLAVES to the world.

 

Colossians 2:6-8...... Cling TIGHTLY to your faith – do not DELIBERATELY do wrong. 
Be careful to follow Christ IN ALL THINGS!  (Rev. 3:11)

 

Romans 12:2............. Don’t change to the things of the world … DON’T COMPROMISE!

 

Romans 1:16............. Instead, in faith (trust) stand up for what you believe.

 

I Timothy 1:19........... What can happen to our faith if we follow man’s misguided ways?

 

Hebrews 10:26, 27... Where can this lead to?

 

·         BUT WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT IF WE DON’T FOLLOW THE THINGS OF THE WORLD?           

 

II Timothy 3:12 & II Timothy 1:8............ Watch – out, expect suffering!

 

I Peter 4:14, 16 & Hebrews 2:18........... Jesus suffered too.

 

·         Remember, a CHRISTIAN is like a tea bag – He doesn’t come to full strength, until He’s put into a little HOT WATER.

 

Luke 6:22, 23............ You have a great reward where?  For what?

 

·         Did you know that the Jehovah’s Witness believe they become martyrs for Christ each time they are rejected while going door–to–door.

 

Matthew 26:41 & Galatians 6:1............. Watch-out, expect temptations! 

How does the “media” tempt us away from maintaining our Christian values?   What can we do to fight this temptation?

 

·         Who does the devil tempt most?  Non-Christians or Christians?  Answer: Christians!  Non-Christians are already his.  HOW CAN CHRISTIANS FIGHT SATANS TEMPTATION?

 

Luke 10:17-20 & Philippians 2:9-11...... Call upon the name of Jesus to bind the powers of Satan.

 

·         Claim the victory JESUS gave us by SUFFERING AND DYING ON A CROSS FOR US, (follow Jesus’ example in Matthew 4:10).  The devil believes the fact that Jesus is the Son of God and trembles.  There’s POWER in the name of JESUS.

 

II Timothy 3:12 – 17 & II Timothy 4:5.......... Growth acts as a two way street: It brings about more temptation BUT can help wipe it out faster too!  (Remember, if you’re not growing – your dying, and temptation can take full control.  Rev. 3:15, 16)

 

·                     Go to church regularly

·                     Read your Bible daily

·                     Open up to Jesus in prayer, and

·                     Witness of His love to others … (II Timothy 4:2)

 

PROMISES:

 

(II Timothy 4:15-18, Paul’s Example)

 

II Corinthians 12:7-10.......... In our weakness, God makes us strong!

 

I Corinthians 10:13............... God will never allow a temptation we cannot handle,

 

Matthew 28:20...................... and He will never leave us!

 

·         STEP OUT IN FAITH (TRUST) ---- AND BELIEVE THIS.

 

“Just as you have trusted God to save you,
also trust Him in each day’s problems,”
He’ll never fail you!